Wednesday, January 27, 2016

BUSY BUSINESS.

Hello.

Just been rather busy since November last year, though there was a lull for a few days over the Christmas break.  Just as well, because with the dire flood warnings, which sounded like they were near, or, at home, we cut into our break  and dashed back to see if everything was okay chez nous.

The busy business will continue for a bit.  It means I won’t have much time for posting, (though I will take any opportunity that presents itself).  However, I intend that all this busy stuff  will not get in the way of keeping in contact and commenting.

Today is Holocaust Memorial Day.  This morning, I heard a very poignant story on the BBC Radio 4 Programme, ‘Midweek,’ about a sock that belonged to a survivor.

January is nearly over; we’re getting an extra hour or so of daylight now.

:)

9 comments:

Kate Braithwaite said...

I was reading about Holocaust Memorial Day.And an article about whether Jewish people could ever mourn for such an immense tragedy and loss... maybe not,he thought.The stormy weather was appropriate.Hope all your work goes well

ZACL said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
ZACL said...

Hi Kate,

I wonder in what overall context the comment was made and who was 'he'?

thanks Kate.

Kate Braithwaite said...

He is a Jewish psychologist who lives in Ißrseli but name escapes me.Mourning is said to be very important so they tell me when I weep butI have only lost one man.To lose entire families is a different scenario.xx

ZACL said...

Massive loss is almost impossible to contemplate; I do wonder though whether the psychologist's perception and definition of grief and loss is rather constrained by his own subjectivities. We shall never know.

Kate Braithwaite said...

You may well be right as it is unknown in human history for such a massive attempt to wipe out any group or race to occur so how to even acknowledge it let alone mourn it seems very hard,alas.

Kate Braithwaite said...

You may well be right as it is unknown in human history for such a massive attempt to wipe out any group or race to occur so how to even acknowledge it let alone mourn it seems very hard,alas.

ZACL said...

The process of the living remembering is, in my view, mass mourning and individual mourning, albeit at different levels. It is also public time put aside for remembering theirs and our dead and lost generations. It is recognised that the sense of these losses can be passed down through the generations and it is openly catered for in Israel. We are not so aware of these inherited sentiments, as far as I know, in the UK.

Kate Braithwaite said...

I am glad it is catered for in Israel.Here people are not good at even normal mourning and want to send folk for counselling if they are sad.As for all the Jewish people here being permitted to mourn,it seems very hard to mourn on such a vast scale.There must be anger and a.ll sorts of feelings exacerbated by feeling nobody wants to know.Let's hope we each help those near us to mourn.~And ourselves... after the funeral people soon pass by on the other side.
Despite this my Jewish neighbour enjoys her life and her daughter.